Cold and Flu Resources

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INFLUENZA

CDC recommends annual influenza vaccination for everyone 6 months and older with any licensed, age-appropriate flu vaccine (IIV, RIV4, or LAIV4) with no preference expressed for any one vaccine over another. Content on this website is being updated to reflect this most recent guidance. 

FAQS REGARDING THE 2018-2019 INFLUENZA SEASON

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FLUVIEW INTERACTIVE   |  Influenza surveillance data the way you want it.  This series of dynamic visualizations allow any Internet user to access influenza information collected by CDC's monitoring systems.
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Centers for Disease Control and Protection

CDC FLYERS TO PRINT

NO MORE EXCUSEShttps://www.cdc.gov/flu/pdf/freeresources/updated/vaccine-locations-flyer.pdf

REASON ENOUGHhttps://www.cdc.gov/flu/pdf/freeresources/young/reason-enough-24x18.pdf

I CAN'T MISS WORKhttps://www.cdc.gov/flu/pdf/freeresources/general/cannot-miss-work-flu-flyer.pdf


COMMON COLD

PROTECT YOURSELF AND OTHERS

When to See a Doctor

You should call your doctor if you or your child has one or more of these conditions:

  • symptoms that last more than 10 days
  • symptoms that are severe or unusual
  • if your child is younger than 3 months of age and has a fever or is lethargic

You should also call your doctor right away if you are at high risk for serious flu complications and get flu symptoms such as fever, chills, and muscle or body aches. People at high risk for flu complications include young children (younger than 5 years old), adults 65 years and older, pregnant women, and people with certain medical conditions such as asthma, diabetes and heart disease.

Your doctor can determine if you or your child has a cold or the flu and can recommend therapy to help with symptoms.